T-Mobile’s Binge On service is a rarity in the telecoms world: it’s a service that doesn’t actively block adult content providers.

The Binge On option allows subscribers to stream content from a number of different video providers without it counting towards any of the data included with your plan. Until now, the only adult content available to stream without eating up data was the Mikandi Theater but Binge On subscribers can also now access Streamate’s live cam network too.

You won’t need any sort of subscription to access the pages either – as a free user, you can check out preview chat and model galleries. In total, there are nearly 90 Binge On partner channels, T-Mobile says.

While it’s good news for Binge On subscribers, criticisms of the efficacy of the service rumble on.

This week, researchers from Northeastern University in Boston aired concerns about the service, including that it regularly drops below the minimum 480p resolution level that’s promised and that the way in which it is implemented might be in violation of the FCC’s Open Internet Order, which is supposed to ensure a level playing field for users and businesses.

“Our research showed that if a video provider does nothing, that is, neither opts into or out of participating with Binge On, its video traffic to T-Mobile subscribers who use Binge On will be given reduced bandwidth, but the subscribers will still be charged for the streaming,” researcher David Choffnes at Northeastern University.

Beyond that, the service can also reportedly have other unexpected results for users – like an inability to access high resolution streams on sites that haven’t even opted in to using Binge On.