Launching later in 2020, the VDOM is a prosthetic adult wearable that the company says goes from “flaccid to erect with the push of a button”. The company, also called VDOM, says the device is controlled via mobile app and makes use of artificial intelligence.

The VDOM is an alternative to the traditional strapon, which hasn’t seen much innovation over the years. The prosthetic is also an attempt at upgrading its less-dynamic counterpart (strapons), which lack the capacity of becoming more erect. As you’d hope for a device like this, it’s made of “ultra-soft” body-safe silicon.

The VDOM has a rechargeable battery, with claimed 24-hour battery life. Handily, you can receive battery notifications via the mobile app, as well as control the device. Perhaps getting closer to the VDOM’s raison d’être, the app also lets you give control of the VDOM to partners.

Among those partner options will be features like the ability to enable, disable, or restrict who can control the device, and an option to create blackout times when the VDOM cannot be activated. You can even send ping notifications when you’re ready to get intimate with a partner.

It’s an ambitious aim, but there are similar products that for various reasons failed to make much of a splash. Denver-based Ambrosia Vibe claimed it would be “the world’s first bionic strap-on that vibrated when touched,” and reached 200 percent of its Indiegogo goal back in 2014, but it has since been discontinued, and the official website is down.

Similarly, Vancouver-based Tacit Pleasures has been working on creating a prototype that uses sensors, wearable computers, and provides direct neural stimulation to create a strapon “you can feel” for people born without a penis. A patent was granted in 2017, but a product hasn’t yet made it to market.

We’re still waiting for a response about how much the VDOM will cost, when exactly it will go on sale, and how artificial intelligence fits into the mix. We’ll let you know if we hear back.

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